Wyoming WIC

Breastfeeding Twins or Multiples

The idea of breastfeeding more than one baby may seem overwhelming at first, but the benefits are well worth it. Many moms of multiples find breastfeeding easier because there is nothing to prepare. A lot of mothers successfully breastfeed more than one baby even after going back to work or school.
The idea of breastfeeding more than one baby may seem overwhelming at first, but the benefits are well worth it. Many moms of multiples find breastfeeding easier because there is nothing to prepare. A lot of mothers successfully breastfeed more than one baby even after going back to work or school.

Finding Support

Talk to WIC, your healthcare provider, hospital, or local breastfeeding center and ask for help with:

Even if your babies need to spend time in the hospital, breastfeeding is still possible.

Making Enough Milk

Most moms of multiples make plenty of milk for their babies. Many mothers exclusively breastfeed or express their milk for triplets or even quadruplets!

Keep these tips in mind:

It helps to have each baby feed from both of your breasts. Switching sides helps keep your milk supply up if one baby isn’t eating as well as the other baby.

You can do this by:

Assigning a breast to each baby for a feeding and switch at the next feeding

OR

Assigning a breast to each baby for a day and switch the next day.

Install this web app on your iPhone: tap ios-share and then Add to Home Screen.

SIDE-LYING HOLD

Side-Lying Hold

  1. For the right breast, lie on your right side with your baby facing you.
  2. Pull your baby close. Your baby’s mouth should be level with your nipple.
  3. In this position, you can cradle your baby’s back with your left arm and support yourself with your right arm and/or pillows.
  4. Keep loose clothing and bedding away from your baby.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

CROSS-CRADLE HOLD

Cross-Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, use your left arm to hold your baby’s head at your right breast and baby’s body toward your left side. A pillow across your lap can help support your left arm.
  2. Gently place your left hand behind your baby’s ears and neck, with your thumb and index finger behind each ear and your palm between baby’s shoulder blades. Turn your baby’s body toward yours so your tummies are touching.
  3. Hold your breast as if you are squeezing a sandwich. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  4. As your baby’s mouth opens, push gently with your left palm on baby’s head to help them latch on. Make sure you keep your fingers out of the way.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

CLUTCH OR “FOOTBALL” HOLD

Clutch or “Football” Hold

  1. For the right breast, hold your baby level, facing up, at your right side.
  2. Put your baby’s head near your right nipple and support their back and legs under your right arm.
  3. Hold the base of your baby’s head with your right palm. A pillow underneath your right arm can help support your baby’s weight.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Bring baby to you instead.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

CRADLE HOLD

Cradle Hold

  1. For the right breast, cradle your baby with your right arm. Your baby will be on their left side across your lap, facing you at nipple level.
  2. Your baby’s head will rest on your right forearm with your baby’s back along your inner arm and palm.
  3. Turn your baby’s tummy toward your tummy. Your left hand is free to support your breast, if needed. Pillows can help support your arm and elbow.
  4. To protect your back, avoid leaning down to your baby. Instead, bring your baby to you.
  5. Reverse for the left breast.

This hold is useful when:

Laid-Back Hold

Laid-Back Hold

  1. Lean back on a pillow with your baby’s tummy touching yours and their head at breast level. Some moms find that sitting up nearly straight works well. Others prefer to lean back and lie almost flat.
  2. You can place your baby’s cheek near your breast, or you may want to use one hand to hold your breast near your baby. It’s up to you and what you think feels best.
  3. Your baby will naturally find your nipple, latch, and begin to suckle.

This hold is useful when: